The Society for the
Psychological
Study of Social Issues

    
Media Advisory, Press Briefing on Healthcare at Charlotte 2012

Find out what new psychological research says about health in the US as the Supreme Court approaches its big verdict on healthcare reform
 
9th Biennial Conference of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI)
OMNI HOTEL, CHARLOTTE, NC
 ___________________________________________
 
PRESS BRIEFING I: Healthcare and Social Disparities (Friday, June 22nd; 9.50am-Juniper Room)
 
Veteran mental health needs are an alarming gap in services
Elizabeth Bennett, Washington and Jefferson College
The Department of Defense funded the four year research project The Combat Stress Intervention Program (CISP) at Washington and Jefferson College. The research which focuses on National Guard and Reserve troops who have been relied on heavily in Afghanistan and Iraq, finds that many current support systems are unprepared and under-resourced. Dr. Bennett will describe these shortcomings and pose some tough questions about how services can learn to meet the unique needs of civilian-veterans.
 
What can't be seen can harm your health: Health disparities among invisible populations 
Stephenie Chaudoir, College of the Holy Cross
Recent reports point to growing health disparities and gaps in care for members of invisible populations such as sexual minorities or people living with HIV or mental illness. Dr. Chaudoir discusses the ways in which social stigma can “get under the skin” to create these disparities and considers the health care policies and practices that can help eliminate these gaps.
 
Children’s cereals see nutritional improvements thanks to 5-year focus by public health researchers 
Jennifer Harris, Yale University, Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity
New research from the Rudd Center at Yale University highlights successes in using research and consumer education to improve food marketing to children. Overall nutritional quality has improved for 13 of 16 child-targeted cereal brands, and cereal advertising to children has declined relative to other packaged foods. Dr. Harris will share more of the results and why cereal companies need to do even more to address childhood obesity. The new report Cereal FACTS 2012: A spoonful of progress in a bowl full of unhealthy marketing to children will be released on June 22nd on www.cerealfacts.org. 
 
The 150th anniversary of the Morill Land Grant Act: re-envisioning land grants in an urban information age
Geoff Maruyama, University of Minnesota
A four year project at the University of Minnesota has re-envisioned its land grant mission for an urban age to create sustainable urban partnerships. According to Dr. Maruyama, “results show improved educational outcomes for youth, increased community vitality and economic activity, and health.” In such partnerships trust, commitment, and a long term perspective are key. Dr. Maruyama will explain why this is and what lessons can be learned in the design of broad community partnerships based on education and public well-being.
 
Free press registration for the conference and the press briefings is at www.spssi.org/SPSSI2012.
 
Related sessions at the conference on healthcare and social disparities can be found here.
_______________________
 
 
Founded in 1936, The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) is a group of over 3000 scientists from psychology and related fields and others who share a common interest in research on the psychological aspects of important social and policy issues. In various ways, SPSSI seeks to bring theory and practice into focus on human problems of the group, the community, and nations, as well as the increasingly important problems that have no national boundaries.
 
Contact: Alex Ingrams, SPSSI Policy Coordinator, aingrams@spssi.org, 202-675-6956. Reply with ‘Unsubscribe’ in the subject line if you no longer wish to receive media communications from SPSSI.
 

Email a Friend Print this Page Give us your feedback


Research that produces nothing but books will not suffice.
                                                                                                                    - Kurt Lewin