The Society for the
Psychological
Study of Social Issues

    

SPSSI Student Newsletter - August 2000

Greetings from the Outgoing Student Committee (SC) Chair

My year as student committee chair is almost over, and what can I say?  It’s been a wonderful experience to work with the student committee on behalf of and for the benefit of SPSSI students.  SPSSI has a tradition of valuing its junior members as a resource, which makes it great to be involved.  And as the SC chair I can tell you that these are more than words: Even when I was asking them for money, my interactions with the SPSSI leadership were pleasant!

 This year’s biggest SPSSI event, the convention in Minneapolis, demonstrated once again that SPSSI has lots to offer to students.  Beyond the rich conference program, there were a number of events designed for students, namely, the student mentorship lunch, an SC-sponsored panel, and the first ever Student Pre-Conference.

 Although conference organizers may be under suspicion of exaggerating the success of “their events,” this time you should believe it:  The first student pre-conference on professional issues was a thorough success!  In two panels, chaired by Amy Marcus-Newhall (Scripps College) and the SC chair, experienced scholars shared with students their expertise on various career paths and their advice with regard to publications, grant-writing, and public policy training.  Even though evaluations from the 30-40 attending students were very positive, it is clear that in future pre-conferences a couple of kinks will have to be worked out.  Foremost, future organizers will be sure to provide free coffee to sustain the audience’s mental concentration.

Shifting focus from the past to the future, we have good news for you concerning opportunities for SPSSI students during this coming year.  Here’s a brief summary:

Analysis of Social Issues and Policy (ASAP)
As you may know already, SPSSI is launching an electronic journal devoted to scholarly work with explicit implications for social action and policy.  The inaugural editor of this journal, Rhoda Unger, has gracefully agreed to have a graduate student member on her editorial board.  See the Call for Nominations in this newsletter (Deadline October 15).

Journal of Social Issues (JSI)
 During this year, Armando Estrada serves as the graduate student member on the editorial board of JSI.  He succeeds former SC chair Jon Iuzzini in this position.  Jon says that he enjoyed working with the JSI editor Irene Frieze and the JSI editorial board.  In case you are interested in this position, look for our Call for Nominations for the JSI student position for 2001-2002 (Deadline February 1).

More travel money
 SPSSI students can apply for a travel award to help their way to the SPSSI conference.  Now, the SPSSI council has appropriated additional travel funds to help students come to SPSSI’s events at APA during years when there is no SPSSI stand-alone conference.  If you are planning on applying to present at APA and you select Division 9 (SPSSI) as your primary APA division, you are eligible to win $150.  Your chances of receiving an award are very good:  In past travel award competitions the majority of applicants did receive a travel award!  Look for the official announcement in your Division 9 application materials for APA 2001.

Membership adoption program
 The SC is in the progress of setting up a web-based membership adoption program.  This program will give students from economically disadvantaged regions of the world a chance to have their SPSSI membership fees covered.  Watch out for the announcement.

 Maybe the biggest news is that soon the new student committee 2000-2001 will take over.  I am confident that with Mischa Thompson at the helm, the SC will be able to expand its activities to benefit SPSSI students.  Among her exciting initiatives is a public policy workshop that will enable students to connect their work to social issues and action—a new opportunity for SPSSI students, and also a new way of helping members to fulfill the mission of SPSSI.
 In closing, I would like to say that it was an honor to serve you.  I have learned a lot, and had the pleasure to work with many dynamic and smart people.  I hope that you will become involved in the SPSSI student committee—just contact the new SC chair, Mischa Thompson (mischat@umich.edu)!

     Wishing you a successful year,

        Markus Kemmelmeier

 



Greetings from the Incoming Chair 

The coming year promises to be very exciting for SPSSI student members.  In addition to continuing past SPSSI services for students such as offering a forum for students on the SPSSI student listserv, maintaining a student editor position on the Journal for Social Issues, providing travel awards to the SPSSI conference, hosting a student paper symposium at the SPSSI conference, and providing professional and developmental services for students at the SPSSI student pre-conference (e.g., see SPSSI webpage
for funding and other professional opportunities for students), the student committee will also offer a number of new services for students.  These will include travel awards to APA conventions, a student editor position on the new on-line SPSSI journal -  Analysis of  Social Issues and Policy, and a student retreat designed to bring young researchers and
policymakers together to inform students of how their research can affect social change. 
 These present and future ventures are not possible without the continued support of SPSSI student members.  Therefore, if you are interested in serving on committees or helping out in any way on any of the projects mentioned above, please do not hesitate to contact me. 

Mischa Thompson, SPSSI 2000-2001 Student Chair-elect - email: mischat@umich.edu


Student Committee Elections!!!

Elections for the 2000-01 SPSSI Student Committee have been mailed.  If you have not received a ballot, contact the main office and make sure your membership is current.  Ballots must be postmarked by August 21, 2000.  Please take the time to vote--each vote makes a difference (how’s that for priming a sense of self-efficacy?). 

Chair-Elect: Beverly Araujo, Teresa Costello, Sam Sommers

Newsletter Editor: Steven M. Elias, Nora Misiolek

Members at Large (2 positions): Rob Foels, Larissa Myaskovsky, Diana R. Nichols, Michael I. Norton

 


Got time on your hands?  Visit SPSSI’s website at www.spssi.org so you can:

  • order SPSSI’s quarterly publication, Journal of Social Issues
  • subscribe to the listserv
  • learn more about a fantastic organization!

Thank You, Mentors!
A most sincere thank you goes out to faculty who participated in the mentor-lunch at the SPSSI conference in Minneapolis.  In addition to sharing a wonderful lunch, these distinguished SPSSI scholars exchanged ideas, information, and imparted wisdom to students on how to do psychology with a social justice focus.  It is through emulating such wonderful models that we upcoming scholars will be able to achieve our goals of social change.  Special thanks to: Jennifer Crocker, Frank Dane, Ken Dion, John F. Dovidio, Victoria Esses, Irene Hanson Frieze, Samuel Gaertner, James Jones, Bernice Lott, Geoffrey Maruyama, Margo Montieth, Louis Penner, Daniel Perlman, Floyd Rudmin, Joseph Trimble, Rhoda Unger, Mark Zanna. 

 


Call for Nominations
Graduate Student Position on the Editorial Board of
Analysis of Social Issues and Policy (ASAP)

The inaugural editor of Analysis of Social Issues and Policy (ASAP), SPSSI’s new electronic journal scheduled to begin publishing in 2001, wishes to reserve one position on the editorial board for an interested and qualified graduate student.  The SPSSI student committee is currently seeking nominations for this position. 
 Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy (ASAP) is a new electronic journal sponsored by the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI). The journal is an outlet for timely and innovative psychological and related social science scholarship with explicit implications for social action and policy.  To learn more about the journal, see ASAP.  (Note that, unlike JSI, ASAP is not a thematic journal).  ASAP board members should be committed to considering overt connections between scholarly work and public policy and will be expected to review manuscripts in their areas of expertise.  As much as possible, all reviewing will take place electronically.
 The ideal candidate for the graduate student position is open-minded and should be familiar with a range of social issues.  He or she should be willing to invest time in order to arrive at an informed judgment on manuscripts and proposals, especially when those concern novel or controversial topics.  It is important that he or she have the ability to explain complex social science research in language suitable for educated consumers who are not necessarily psychologists.  Further, the ideal candidate must have reliable internet access and be a competent user of the web.  Previous experience with web publication is desirable (although not required).  Since editorial work takes time and energy, and because we want to give as many students as possible the chance to share in this opportunity, the term of the graduate student member of the editorial board will be limited to one year (January 1, 2001 – December 31, 2001).
If you are interested in this position and are enrolled in a doctoral program in psychology or a related field, please submit an email attachment including your current vita and a personal statement highlighting your interest and qualifications to: 
SPSSI Central Office, spssi@spssi.org
Deadline for nominations is October 15, 2000.  Self-nominations are welcome.  In case you have any questions concerning the position, please contact the ASAP editor Rhoda Unger, Ph.D., asap@spssi.org.


Call for Nominations:
Graduate Student Position on the Editorial Board of Journal of Social Issues

The editor of the Journal of Social Issues (JSI) reserves one position on the Editorial Board for an interested and qualified graduate student.  The SPSSI student committee is currently seeking nominations for this position.  Given the nature of JSI as a thematic journal, editorial board members review and evaluate proposals for new JSI issues.  Although editorial board members have expertise in their own area of research and scholarship, it is essential that they are able to adopt a broad perspective in evaluating the overall relevance and merit of the proposals to the study of social issues.  The ideal candidate is open-minded and should be familiar with a range of social issues.  He or she must be willing to invest time in order to arrive at an informed judgment on proposals, especially when those concern novel or controversial topics.  Previous experience with the publication process is required.  Since editorial work takes time and energy, and because we want to give as many students as possible the chance to share in this opportunity, the term of the graduate student member of the editorial board will be limited to one year (July 1, 2001 – June 30, 2002).  If you are interested in this position, are enrolled in a doctoral program in psychology or a related field, and are a member of SPSSI, please submit a current vita and personal statement highlighting your interest and qualifications.  Send the materials through regular mail or as an email attachment to:

    SPSSI Central Office
     Student Committee--JSI Search
    P.O. Box 1248
    Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1248
    spssi@spssi.org
Deadline for nominations is February 1, 2001.  Self-nominations are welcome.  Note that email access is imperative for this position.  In case you have any questions concerning the position, please contact the current graduate student member of the JSI editorial board: Armando X. Estrada, University of Texas at El Paso, Psychology Department, El Paso, TX 79968-0551; phone: (915) 747-6559; email: axestrad@utep.edu

Science in Action:
Adrienne Y. Stith, James Marshall Public Policy Scholar

I began my tenure as the James Marshall Scholar eight months ago.  I am learning a great deal about legislative process and some of the issues in the forefront during this session of Congress.  It has truly been an exciting time.  My journey to this point has been filled with interesting and varied experiences.  I received my degree from the University of Vermont in 1997 in Clinical Psychology.  I served youth and families in outpatient, inpatient, hospital, and school settings. After completing a clinical internship at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago, I started a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, NY in Pediatric Psychology and Adolescent Health. 

It was there that I received my first taste of policy.  I developed an increasing interest in addressing the problems facing individuals through broader social change as opposed to individual level intervention.  My clinical experiences with children in foster care, adolescent mothers, and poor urban youth demonstrated the importance and need for addressing these issues on a programmatic level.  I worked with individuals and families who exhibited anxiety, depression, externalizing behaviors and substance use as a result of stresses in their environments and/or in attempts to cope with them. 

I have come to appreciate the need for an effective bridge between psychological practice, research, and policy efforts.  The James Marshall Public Policy Fellowship has provided experiences that have allowed me to use my scientific knowledge to influence policy.  One of the most exciting issues in which I have been involved is ethnic disparities in health care and health research.  This has been a wonderful opportunity to use my knowledge of research to influence the development of legislation.  Three bills were introduced this session regarding health disparities. 

The first (H.R. 2391), was introduced by Representative Jesse Jackson, Jr. (D-IL).  This bill would establish within NIH a National Center for Research on Domestic Health Disparities that would conduct and support research pertaining to minority health.  Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA) introduced a bill (S. 1880), an amendment to the Public Health Service Act, that would also establish a NIH Center For Research on Minority Health and Health Disparities.  In addition, this bill provides for loan repayment programs, grants for health professions education curriculum, and data collection on services for minority populations.  Representative Bennie Thompson (D-MS) introduced a companion measure to S 1880 in the House (H.R. 3250).  I have worked to amend the language of the House and Senate bills to make them inclusive of behavioral and social science.  As introduced, the bills focused on the use of biomedical research to close the disparities gap.  I have met with numerous offices on both the House and Senate side to discuss the contributions of behavioral and social science to health research and how crucial this work is to closing the disparities gap.  In addition, I recently organized a congressional briefing on this topic in conjunction with APA, the Consortium of Social Science Associations, and the National Association of Social Work. 

By bringing researchers to the Hill, we were able to educate Congressional staff about the multitude of social, psychological, and economic factors that influence health status and the significant contributions of behavioral and social science research. 

The fellowship is a wonderful and unique opportunity to link research and policy.  I have been struck by how critical social science is for so many policy issues and more so by how much knowledge there is to impart on our elected officials.  If you have any questions about the fellowship, becoming involved in policy, or about the disparities or other legislation please do not hesitate to contact me at astith@apa.org.


Research that produces nothing but books will not suffice.
                                                                                                                    - Kurt Lewin