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Social Issues from Student Perspectives Submission Guidelines

2018-2019 Submission Criteria


Social Issues from Student Perspectives is the graduate student section of SPSSI’s newsletter, The Forward. Writing a piece for Social Issues from Student Perspectives provides an opportunity for graduate students to disseminate their work to the larger SPSSI community and to gain experience with the publication process. We encourage submissions from all subfields of psychology and closely related fields.

 

Submissions may take many forms, including, but not limited to: emerging research by graduate students, tips for surviving graduate school (e.g., writing, time management, applying for academic or non-academic jobs), describing policy implications of research, and commentary on current events/social issues that incorporates the student’s research and/or psychological theory in general.

Criteria                                                                                                                            

  • At least 1 author must be a student member of SPSSI
  • Multiple authors (up to 5) are allowed
  • Send all submissions to Christina Lapytskaia, the 2018-2019 editor, at spssigsc@gmail.com


Each submission must contain the following:

  • Author names and affiliations
  • Email address of the first author (please note if you do not want this email address to be published along with the submission)
  • 3-5 keywords that describe the topic area of your submission
  • Photo of the author(s)
  • Figure or photo that further explains the written content (optional but encouraged)
  • Attach submission as a Word document and photos/figures as .jpg files.
  • You will receive a submission receipt within 2-3 business days


Questions? Please contact the Social Issues from Student Perspectives editor, Christina Lapytskaia, at spssigsc@gmail.com.


Submission Categories

Research Spotlight
Promote and disseminate your research to the larger SPSSI community. Submissions from all areas of psychology are welcome. The purpose is to translate your research to a broad
audience. Abstracts are not required. Examples of research topics include: emerging research by graduate students, policy implications of research, or commentary on current events/social issues that incorporates the student’s research and/or psychological theory in general. We would especially love to hear from students who have received grant funding from SPSSI and would love to highlight the research you have completed using your SPSSI grant.

Mentoring from the Margins
Reflect on your journey as a scholar and share important lessons that you learned along the way that might benefit current and future graduate students. In 500 words or less, please discuss in depth the challenges you faced and provide tips and advice for those who might want to follow in your footsteps.

Diversity Spotlight
Reflect on how your diverse identities (marginalized and/or privileged) shape the way in which you think about and do research, develop professional relationships with community
organizations, and give back to those communities. How does your research reflect
underrepresented minority groups? We encourage you to take an intersectional approach when writing about your identities.

How-To
In 500 words or less, please write a guide on a specific aspect of graduate school and career
development. Topics can include but are not limited to the first year of graduate school, the dissertation process, qualifying exams, internship applications, preparing for the job market, teaching, and life outside school.