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CALL FOR COLLABORATION - SPSSI 2020 CONFERENCE
Deadline: Friday, December 20, 2019 
 

The SPSSI 2020 conference is scheduled for June 26-28 in Denver, CO, and the deadline for conference submissions is January 5, 2020. In preparation for the conference, your Graduate Student Committee has teamed up to offer opportunities to collaborate on submissions for a number of potential symposia!  
 
Please review the collaboration opportunities below, and feel free to disseminate them to your friends and colleagues. If your research aligns with any of these topics and you’re interested in collaborating, please reach out to the email address provided by Friday, December 20, 2019. Reaching out before the deadline to indicate your interest is much appreciated by our panel organizers! We ask that you provide a brief summary of your proposed contribution to the panel be prepared to share an abstract (200 words max) with the symposium organizer.  


SYMPOSIA TOPICS 

 
Of Melting Pots & Mosaics – Current Psychological Perspectives on Immigration

With the effects of climate change and social-political upheaval around the world, immigration, both forced and voluntary, becomes a larger focus in social and political discourse. This panel will explore research pertaining to issues surrounding immigration from the perspective of citizens in the immigrant-receiving countries, and from the perspective of immigrants themselves. This symposium will consider abstracts regarding shifts in political and social attitudes relating to immigration, and antecedents and consequences of pro-and anti-immigrant attitudes. We welcome qualitative, quantitative, and theoretical work. 
If you are interested in collaborating on this panel, please send your 200-word abstract and/or topic to Zahra Mirnajafi at z.mirnajafi@uq.net.au or Nihan Albayrak-Aydemir at n.albayrak1@lse.ac.uk. If you are unsure if your research would be suited for this symposium, feel free to email in advance.  
 
Contemporary examinations of the predictors and consequences of hate, intergroup violence, and bias crime

Intergroup violence and hate have long histories across social, political, and international contexts. In the current context, it is important to understand the contemporary and historical 
antecedents, resulting consequences of, and public and policy reactions to hate, intergroup violence, and bias crime. This symposium will consider abstracts examining the contemporary underpinnings and consequences of hate, intergroup violence, and bias crime. Presentations can include presentation of original data, theoretical examinations, or applied & policy approaches. 
If you are interested in collaborating on this panel, please send your 200-word abstract and/or topic to Jaboa Lake at jaboa@pdx.edu. If you are unsure if your research would be suited for this symposium, feel free to email in advance.  
 
Community-based research: Collaborations in health and policy Community-based organizations

(CBOs) play a critical role in providing access to health services and in creating policies and environments for improved health. This symposium is seeking collaborators who wish to present work on community engaged research that addresses social inequities in access to health or social services. We will consider abstracts that reflect community-engaged research that advocates for marginalized identities, participatory research with CBOs, social justice research utilizing community-academic partnerships (CAPs), and other community projects that integrate collaborations with community stakeholders. We will also consider abstracts that integrate community partners into program design and evaluations.  
 
If you are interested in collaborating on this symposia proposal, please send your 200-word abstract and/or topic to Tatiana Elisa Bustos at Bustosta@msu.edu. If you are unsure if your research would be suited for this symposium, please feel free to email in advance.  
 
 
Neuro developmental disruptions in children with a history of prostitution: Possible implications for social policy reform

The commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) is a unique form of trauma due to its complex and layered assault on the child. This panel will explore research around chronic stressors and complex trauma and their impact on the neurobiological development of children. This will be linked to subsequent effects on both interpersonal and academic success. We will link these findings to children who have survived sexual exploitation and analyse the language of victim, criminal, delinquent and disorder.  We will explore implications for educational and mental health reform as well as legislative change.  
 
This symposium will consider abstracts examining disruptions in neurodevelopmental success in childhood in relationship with ACES, complex trauma , exploitation etc and its link to justice systems, resource allocation and legislation. Presentations can include original data, theoretical examinations, or applied & policy approaches. 

If you are interested in collaborating on this panel, please send your 200-word abstract and/or topic to Obiageli at obiageliuguru@fuller.edu.  If you are unsure if your research would be suited for this symposium, feel free to email in advance. 
 
 
Using Psychological Science to Impact Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

Many institutions and organizations have sought to integrate quality Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) efforts into the core of its functioning in order to improve the experience of underrepresented, underserved and vulnerable populations. Examining, creating, and implementing empirically based strategies is critical to ensuring positive opportunities for individuals from marginalized groups. This symposium will explore the use of psychological research in understanding the experiences and perspectives of marginalized individuals within the context of EDI. Furthermore, we seek research examining EDI strategy development, as well as implementation, across various settings. Presentations can include presentation of original data, theoretical examinations, or applied & policy approaches. 
 
If you are interested in collaborating on this panel, please send your 200-word abstract and/or topic to Chelsea Crittle at chelsea.crittle@tufts.edu. If you are unsure if your research would be suited for this symposium, feel free to email in advance.  
 
Sexual Victimization: Examining Societal and Self Perceptions of Victims, Perpetrators, and Bystanders

Sexual violence is a pervasive issue on college campuses across the United States that is associated with detrimental psychological, physical, social, and academic consequences for victims. Research contributing to how victims, perpetrators, and bystanders are perceived, and even how they perceive themselves is essential to both prevention efforts and providing effective post-victimization resources. This symposium will consider abstracts examining the relationship between sexual victimization and the varying stages at which perceptions of victims, bystanders, and perpetrators might be impacted, particularly for those identifying with a minority group or underrepresented population. Presentations can include original data, theoretical examinations, or applied & policy approaches.   

If you are interested in applying, please send your 200-word abstract and/or topic to Raven Douglas at raven.douglas1@louisiana.edu. If you are unsure if your research would be suited for this symposium, feel free to email in advance.